Introducing your Lexis Library (law eresource) student expert

We are excited to welcome a whole host of new Law students, as well as those lucky second-year Business Students about to start studying the law in their compulsory business law unit.  You will all be happy to hear that Lexis has appointed a new Student Associate, Joel Rogers (henceforth, the “Lexis Rep” because I’m already forgetting their full job title), who can help you learn how to get the most from one of our most powerful legal information resources, Lexis Library.  From the law itself to case law passed under it, you will find everything you need in Lexis Library and its competitor Westlaw.

We’ll be in touch soon to introduce Westlaw’s student rep, but first here is Joel, in his own words.

Introducing Joel Rogers, Lexis Library student rep

My name is Joel Rogers, and I’m a 3rd Year Law Student. I’m also your LexisNexis Student Associate for the 2019/20 academic year.

I’m sure you’ve already heard of LexisNexis, but if you haven’t, it is an online legal database that you already have access to. You can use it to search for up-to-date cases, journals, commentary, legislation, and more. If you want to achieve the best marks in your law degree, and make the most of your time studying, then Lexis is an essential service.

My role as Student Associate means that I am available to help you with day-to-day use of the Lexis service, that I can help you gain certifications, and that I’m on hand to help you should you have any difficulties with the service. Throughout the year I will run seminars, training sessions, and certification sessions, which will provide you with crucial information for using Lexis and a fantastic boost to your CV.

If you want your coursework’s to take less time and return more marks, then keep your eyes and ears peeled for any events being run!

You can contact me if you have any questions or queries about anything.

 

Don’t forget your Library subject team

The Business and Law subject teams are here to help with everything from finding high-quality legal information (and why anyone caught Googling legislation.gov.uk should be thrown out… using a trebuchet) to referencing using that peculiar referencing system used in Law called OSCOLA.

Posted in People, Subjects: Law & Criminology Tagged with: , , ,

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