International Women in Engineering Day

Woman engineerHappy International Women in Engineering Day!

Women have traditionally been underrepresented in the science, technology, computing and mathematical professions, yet their contributions have been critical in shaping the modern world, as STEMjobs and IveyEngineering describe.  Ada Lovelace invented the fundamentals of programming before electronic computers were even invented, Grace Murray Hopper first coined the term debugging code, which at first meant removing insects that had become caught in the delicate calculating machinery.  While in science Marie Curie stands out as one of the most influential figures in twentieth century physics, who remembers Einstein’s wife, who was a respected engineer in her own right or the small group of black American women who were instrumental in putting man on the moon, whose tale is now chronicled in recent Hollywood film release “Hidden figures”.

A lack of visibility of women working successfully in these fields is recognised to have discouraged others from following in their footsteps. International Women in Engineering Day is intended to help counter this trend by shining a spotlight on the success of women working as engineers. You can find more support and campaign
ideas for anyone encouraging more women engineers from WISE, the Campaign for Gender Balance in Science, Technology and Engineering and IEEE Women in Engineering.  You can also find out more about women in science and technology through the Discovery Service or browse the IEEE Women in Engineering magazine. Read more ›

Posted in Thing of the Day Tagged with: , ,

Happy World Blood Donor Day!

World Blood Donor DayHappy World Blood Donor Day!  14th June each year is when the world celebrates the altruistic actions of millions who donate blood to maintain badly needed reserves of blood and blood products, such as plasma.  Anyone who is injured, falls ill, requires an operation or otherwise needs blood, including hemophiliacs, cancer patients and others with blood disorders rely upon these donations of blood to survive.  The World Health Organisation website explores the role of blood transfusions in more detail.

Blood banks are frequently understocked, sometimes dangerously so, and donors are always in great demand.  If you are thinking about becoming a blood donor, you can find out more here.

 

Posted in Thing of the Day Tagged with: ,

Showcasing your blossoming research for REF 2018: introducing ORCIDs

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) assessment approaches once again.  Research England has strongly recommended anyone submitting to the REF in 2018 to have their own Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID).  If you want more information on setting up and linking your ORCID to your PURE profile, we have you covered.

Click or tap here to find out more about ORCIDs and how to make them work for you.

 

Posted in Services Tagged with:

Farewell to the front of the building

The old University logo mounted on the front of the University Library Well, perhaps not quite all of it, but today is the long awaited day when the illuminated logo on the front of the library building is replaced.  Today we see take last lingering look at a sign that has probably been a part of the library longer than anyone still working here.  Change is one of the signs of life, however, and the institutional rebranding continues apace.

We anticipate some noise disruption today but would like to reassure everyone that it should be short-lived and that earplugs are available to anyone who feels they need them from the Welcome Desk.

Posted in About your Library, Services Tagged with: ,

Google as platform, Google as publisher?

Macbook displaying Google Deutschland search homepageAmong the many things Google is involved in at the moment is the controversial new e-journal Distill, a product of its the Distill Working Group.  Operated at a distance as a peer-reviewed academic journal in the area of artificial intelligence, questions are being raised about its standing and, more importantly, whether this makes Google now a publisher and media company.  Read more on the Scholarly Kitchen blog.

If you are looking to publish a journal article in any field of research, please read our advice and if you have any queries or concerns, contact the Research Outputs Team (openaccess@port.ac.uk) for advice.

 

Posted in Services Tagged with: , ,

Problems opening interlibrary loan documents

What to do if you are trying to open a document from the British Library and you get this error message:

This computer must be connected to the network in order to open this document. Connect this computer to the network and then try opening the document again.

This error occurs because Adobe no longer support old versions of Transport Layer Security.  Please click “Read more” (below) for instructions on how to resolve this issue.

Read more ›

Posted in Services

From “Gin Lane” to World Gin Day

Cartoon depiction of the evils of gin consumption by British artist William Hogarth.Tomorrow is World Gin Day.  Dubbed “mother’s ruin” in Victorian Britain, in a campaign that at one point saw people seriously recommending the “warming effects of beer” over the chill charms of the juniper-scented spirit.  Gin, like all alcoholic drinks, can cause problems when enjoyed to excess or in an escape to drown out emotional problems.  Gin has been singled out for derision historically because it was the cheapest and most readily available form of alcohol, providing unwelcome competition for organised religion as the consolation of the masses.  Slammed in the popular nineteenth century cartoon “Gin Lane” by William Hogarth (right),  which depicts a drunken women slumped in the throws of gin fuelled alcoholism to the point she is blissfully unaware of her infant child falling a great distance from her arms, gin has also featured as the voiceless villain in such films as “The sorrows of gin” (available through our Digital Theatre Plus subscription, link below).  It is perhaps not surprising that the gin industry has since felt the need for a bit of self-promotion!   Read more ›

Posted in Thing of the Day Tagged with: ,

Have another look at History: two new resources for historians

Twentieth century feminist posterThe Library is pleased to present new and expanded historical resources covering gender and social change and documentation on the papers of state, including a brand new resource, Gender: Identity and Social Change and a huge expansion to the authoritative State Papers Online.  

Gender: Identity and Social Change

Primary sources, including images, about gender roles from the 19th century to the present.  This resource supports the study of women’s suffrage, the feminist movement, the men’s movement, employment, education, the body, the family and more in the UK, USA and Australia.

Greatly expanded access to State Papers Online

Following on from our popular access to Tudor and Stuart State Papers, the library has now bought access to 18th Century State Papers Online Part 1, including Registers of the Privy Council as well as documents on domestic, military and naval matters. Whether you are interested in the Jacobite rebellion, the Seven Years’ War with France, the Boston Tea Party or official correspondence to and from the First Lords of the Admiralty, take a look at the wide selection of beautifully hand-scripted manuscripts.
Posted in Subjects: Humanities, Thing of the Day Tagged with: ,

New eBooks – May 2018

What follows is a list of new electronic books received by the Library during May 2018 ordered by title. More complete details, as well as listings from previous months, are available on our website’s New Books page in the form of downloadable Excel spreadsheets.

Read more ›

Posted in About your Library Tagged with: ,

New Books – May 2018

What follows is a list of new books received in the Library during May 2018 ordered by classmark. More complete details, as well as listings from previous months, are available on our website’s New Books page in the form of downloadable Excel spreadsheets.

Read more ›

Posted in About your Library Tagged with: ,